Monthly Archives: April 2016

Personal Reflection onAPPLIED PERFORMANCE as AMODULE

APPLIED PERFORMANCE as AMODULE

I have very much enjoyed the module and have been able to identify my area of most interest which is: Theatre in Education, though I have found other areas equally interesting, informative and self-developmental.. Applied theatre is been a process of me becoming something rather than having something and it is significant in this context. I agree with brackets that great art would educate the inner mind to reach perfection. And to achieve aims for the session I need to look at myself as a co-leaner and facilitator. Hahn emphasizes that the practice of healer, therapist, and teacher should be directed to the facilitator first because if the help is unhappy he/she can’t help many people. Education should be seen as an open –ended and non-routine with multiple solutions to questions.  Nichlson a firms the above when she states that applied science has a high status in the academy than pure science. Same applies to theatre.

This illustrates the methods became exhausted; stimuli no longer work. New problems appeared and demanded new measures. Reality changes, in order to represent it, modes of representation must change. Nothing comes of nothing the new comes from the old. The oppressor does not work in the same way in every epoch. They cannot be defined in the same fixed fashion at all times.

I share Nicholson’s belief (2005,2014, P.4) in the power of theatre form to address something beyond form itself, and agree with her that applied theatre or Performance can be used in order to promote positive social processes with a particular community, or promote an understanding of human resource among corporate employees. The intentions of course vary; they could be to inform, to cleanse, to unify, to instruct or to raise awareness. Nicholson remarks that the term applied theatre has been described in multiple ways during the first decade of the twenty –first century, the new name revived debates about the value and principles associated with participatory form of theatre-making. She points out that the debate most regularly revisited is the relationship between artistry and instrumentalism that has long been a concern across different forms of educational and community-based performance. she argues that applied theatre is most useful as a term when it is used to put into context theatre making in educational, therapeutic, or community setting instead of defining particular methodology. Which the module was most focused on.  Nicholson insists that applied theatre is most relevant when used to open intellectual, ethical and political questions about social engagement in theatre practice, when it poses challenging questions and provides critical frames for reflection. I was able to experience this in the module with stop and……… project and TiE participatory applied performance project.  (Nicholson (2014) Applied theatre the gift of theatre 2nd edn)

 

From theTiE participatory applied performance project I agree with Tonny  (p.2) that theatre can be used as an educational medium and as a way of actively engaging the audience in the learning process.

We could argue that there is no particular definition of theatre in education but Tonny  suggests it should be seen as a new form of theatre. That was started with the intention and purposes to coordinate and carefully structure pattern of activities, usually devised and researched by the company, around a topic of relevance both to the school curriculum and to the children’s own lives. This was well illustrated in our play Bilingual (The Hare and the Tortoise.) it was a play written in Bilingualism and English and was targeting the Bangladeshi community which had about 90% of the children in schools in Tower Hamlet. He further starts that (p.18) theatre in education emerged from the new thinking and atmosphere of experiments that characterized the British theatre of the mid-1960s.

Theatre in education first began in 1965 as a project of Belgrade theatre in Coventry, , During the postwar process, Donald Gibson was alarmed to the need of public place of entertainment and the Belgrade Theatre Coventry was the first new civic producing house theatre to be opened in the post war England in March 1958, The theatre used TIE to address the personal symbols and cultural capital of memories associated with Coventry’s residence’s everyday practices of living   (Nicolson, theatre education and performance 2011, p.63)

According to tony (1993, p.18)a unit of four actor-teachers, funded jointly by Belgrade Theatre and the local authority used a number of pilot projects in schools to demonstrated vividly the value of future as an educational method and lead to the setting up of the full-time theatre in education

(Tony Jackson Learning through theatre 1993, p.18)

After reading Nicholson’s book applied drama (p6-7) it is evident that applied theatre is academically interdisciplinary and artistically each text count of many different approaches of theatre making and performance. As Nicholson points out, the application of drama to different institutional and community settings in the streets raises fundamental questions about the role and significance of theatre practices to society in general.

Nicolson makes an interesting point about the complexly as of learning and teaching that had been taking place and perhaps more particularly, how the collaboration process of making theatre had supported the children in the developing an empathetic understanding of history

During the TiE participatory applied performance project, the teachers and we as the practitioners brought different experiences and expertise to the work, the teacher’s knowledge of children’s development combined with the theatre makers understanding of the dramatic metaphors and produced a structure that supports children’s learning. The children being involved in the project, understood how dramatic form and curriculum content helping them to be part of story.  This to me proven that Thomas Kuhn (1962)’s Emerging paradigms are very effective in drama in education

Thomas Kuhn’s paradigms (The Structure of Scientific Revolutions 1962) describes paradigm as set of beliefs shared by scientist, a set of agreement of how a problem should be solved. Kuhn provides us with two examples of paradigm. Traditional paradigm; which can refer to the banking system of education, where a student is a passive recipient and a teacher is an information give,  in other words only teacher directed learning. This system limits student’s view of ‘intelligence as they are sorted and stream on a base of one answer and one way correctness, setting them tests that test and the criteria can be given by teachers only.

While with Emerging paradigm; students are active constructors of meaning and can direct learning. It looks at the teacher as a co-leaner and facilitator. Hahn emphasizes that the practice of healer, therapist, and teacher should be directed to the facilitator first because if the help is unhappy he/she can’t help many people. Education should be seen as an open –ended and non-routine with multiple solutions to question, this can be achieved by setting tests that teach providing Equal access for all and expect shared criteria.

Bell Hook gives a clear sense and meaning on how emerging paradigm is applicable in the education system. Hook enlightens that this system doesn’t only seek to empower students but also the growth of teachers and empowering them too in the process.

 

Overall the module improved my theoretical understanding of theatre and developed my practical skills through: community-based and educational setting applied performance practices like: stop and…….project and TiE participatory project. I have also attained a wide  range of methodologies of applied performance practice in the areas of: community theatre/performance, , theatre for development, theatre in conflict settings, theatre in criminal justice settings, theatre in education, theatre for young audiences theatre with refugee/asylum seekers, , and will use the skills attained as a spring board to my career and share the gift of applied theatre in areas where its most desired.

Ref list

Nicholson, H.  (2014) Applied Theatre the Gift of Theatre 2nd edn. Macmillan: UK England

Nicolson H. 2011) theatre education and performance . Macmillan: UK England

Tony Jackson. (1993) Learning through theatre 2nd edn. London and New York: Routledge

 

 

 

TiE Project.School Performance

I was extremely nervous but very excited we met at the venue by 9.45 am. we entered the hall at 10am, dressed up and then did rehearsals  warm up sessions before the children arrived.

we were horned by the presence of  Chris Ewell (Artistic Director of the Half Moon YPT) at the first workshop and Clare Qualman a UEL lecturer  and the schools  head of dream  at our second workshop.

it was a fully participatory performance, the children where as excited as we where and they engaged and participated easily.  having liselle  Narratoring the story guide and controlled the performance because the children were extremely excited

my highlight is how the children engaged and responded to the performance,  when we got in small groups where asked to create still images depicting the moral of the story

Below is our  script of the whole performance.

Brief Context: by lisselle

This one-hour Drama-In-Education (DiE) participative performance workshop, The Tortoise and The Hare developed by BA (Hons.) Drama, Applied Theatre & Performance Level 6 students with tutor guidance. The workshop is aimed at children in Year 1 and Year 2 and is adapted from the Half Moon Young People’s Theatre archived bilingual play from 1984. We are delighted to be working in partnership with the Half Moon YPT for this project as it has enabled out Level 5 students at UEL to gain an insight and professional experience into DiE in Tower Hamlets. Our overall aim for the workshop is to use participative, whole group in-role and Facilitator-In-Role techniques traditionally used in Theatre In Education (TiE) to encourage the children to use their own experiences, critical reflection to explore issues surrounding friendship, empathy and difference.

Pre-workshop activity suggestions for school:

The story takes place in a forest and centers around four friends; elephant, fox, hare, and tortoise. It would be wonderful if the class teacher could lead a craft activity with the children before Tuesday 15th March that involved one or a few of the following:

  • Each child makes a simple mask that represents either an elephant, a fox, a tortoise or a hare
  • Each child or in pairs make a Forest picture / painting.
  • It would also be brilliant if the children could think of some forest / rain forest sounds that they might hear if they were in a forest?
  • Finally, could the children wear name tags on their tops?

Resources for workshop:

  • Possible Props for each animal (e.g. Fluffy duster for fox; Long tube for elephant? Ears for rabbit or face paint; tortoise shell for tortoise; (bring my yellow wings the sun (?)
  • Name tags for the children.
  • Costume for the UEL students to include block colours – legging and tops.
  • Small PA system and music from original Hare and Tortoise play.

THE ANIMALS AND THEIR CHARACTERISTICS:

  •  Elephant (Tiam & Rose): peacemaker and tries to support and encourage tortoise, courageous, supportive, empathetic, big friendly giant, clumsy, wrinkly, heavy, slow, confident, wise, humble
  • Tortoise (Ash, Prima): good at numbers, slow, shy, willing to learn, reserved, naïve, confused, insecure,
  • Hare (Mercedes, Diana): careless, comes across as over-confident, trickster, big-headed, arrogant, attention-seeking, insecure, jealous, competitive, feels isolated, neglected, belittling, low-self-esteem, teasing, big baby.

Fox: (Abdul, Amber) Teasing, sly, Sliding, Elegant, Sneaky, Hard to get, fast, stops and hides and sneakily looks around; nasty, enjoys causing trouble, stirring things (why is she like this?), shady,

Outline of the DiE Participative Performance Workshop: 

PART 1: Meeting the animals

  1. In a circle standing welcome and introduce ourselves and explain that we are here to tell a story but we need your help. Say our names.
  2. Diana introduces and leads the CHANT with NAMES. (4 names at a time which we repeat).
  3. Liselle – Our story takes place in a forest – a magical forest where the animals play and talk. Can you create the sounds of the forest – what might we hear? A short soundscape of the forest.
  4. Have you ever seen a hare leap? Or a tortoise eat? Have you ever met a strong elephant sleeping or a sneaky, sly fox playing? Come with me into our magical forest where the animals eat, sleep and play – The sun is setting – lets meet some of the animal families –
  1. Cue for each group of animals to perform the rehearsed eating, sleeping and playing to pre-recorded music and making eye-contact and holding hands with the children.
  1. Let’s meet the different families – what are they like – what can we tell about them? PLAY INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC.
  2. What did you see? What did you find out about these forest animals?
  1. It’s a usual morning and the ‘baby’ animals are rising after a long sleep ready to play. (One by one they enter the circle, the fox, then tortoise, then elephant then hare. They greet each other in DIFFERENT LANGUAGES AND IN DIFFERENT PLAYFUL WAYS. They greet the children who they interact with as animals.
  1. They share different ideas of what to do until the Hare comes up with ‘Let’s dig a hole’. The foxes order everyone to start digging and they all including the children sing the Chant quietly. Fox then says, ’let’s stop for a rest’. Everyone FREEZE. Then after 3 counts the 2 hares fall into the hole – slow motion until on the ground.
  1. The fox then suggests that the elephant use her trunk and then the elephants ask the children to help and to hold on to pull out the hares. The succeed and everyone cheers.
  1. The tortoise congratulates the elephant and says what a wonderful, brave job she did to help the hare. The elephant is getting a lot of attention, and the Hare doesn’t like this.
  1. The hares step in and says, ‘I could have pulled myself out of the hole by myself – I didn’t need anyone’s help – especially not the elephant or those little animals. Infact look at your little wrinkly legs tortoise – you would never have got out of the hole if you had fallen in. Infact look at my long strong legs, and your little wrinkly legs (repeat). We dare you to a race – ha ha we will win. The tortoise says, ‘Ok – I’ll race you’.

PART 2: The Race

The Race. The two animals stand side by side ready for the race – and they set off to the music from the original play. The hares race round (but actually move in slow motion) and the tortoises hardly move at all. The hares arrive half way and start chilling and relaxing with the children and making fun of the slow tortoise. Both hares eventually decide to have a wee rest.

Meanwhile the tortoise has lost all of her confidence and she really doubts herself – especially as she passes the hare – she think she will awake and win. The children with the help of the elephants encourage her to keep going. This really helps her and the tortoises and several of the children manage to make it to the finish line before the hare does. The hare awakes just before the tortoise wins.(Big cheering.)

PART 3: Creative Reflection

Children reflecting upon the drama:In groups of threes (with each student with a group of three children) the children have to decide on what the animals in the story might learn from what happened? Can they show this in a ‘photograph’ with their bodies and decide on a caption / a title.

This might (for example) be….

Stand up for your friends / respect others and appreciate difference.

 

 

 

Continue reading TiE Project.School Performance

FINAL REHEARSAL TIE

REHEARSEL 8  TIE

This was our last rehearsal  it was directed by our  tutor Liselle. We had agreed that each pair of animals could come with similar clothes, liselle provided us with a number of costumes and improvised with some that we had brought, so we had a dress rehearsal, liselle had also invited other students to came and be our audience and also to use their opinion and feedback to improve our performance.

with our costumes and props we run through the play, and then the visiting students gave us they feed back and opinions, we briefly continued to  on out was pointed out.

Then liselle gave us a brief overview of the day :

we were going to work with two  year 2 classes for an hour each, first class was from 11am-12noon, and 1.30-2.30pm for the second class, the session was to take place on the 15th/04/2016 at Lansbury Lawrence primary school, Cordelia Street, E14 6DZ

The pupil were asked to complete some pre-workshop tasks, like  creating animal masks of the characters in play  and  we could ask to see them before the workshop / as part of it – at the start. this made the pupils co-creators of the play

liselle with the help of the music students had created an instrumental for the song in the play but because we did have enough time to rehearsal we agreed to leave it out. challenge was lack of enough time for rehearsal but our lecturer reassured us, and advised we do some extra rehearsals out of class time

 

Dress rehearsal – try out on each other – and poss. other students from other year groups. (WEEK 8, 8TH MARCH 2016) – Applied Performance site

PRECIS

BIG BRUM:

is a charity that s provides  Theatre in Education programmes for young people of all age ranges and abilities. The company uses theatre and drama alongside young people to make meaning of their lives and the world around them.

They work has a strong theoretical basis: focusing artistically on the power of theatre images and dramatic action to create resonances and challenge us to new ways of thinking; whilst being educationally grounded in active learning and problem solving.

Big Brum was founded in 1982 as a registered charity. The Core funders of Big Brum is Arts Council England. Since formation, over 80 schools, pupil referral units and other educational spaces throughout the West Midlands, and over 4,000 children and young people benefit from the company’s work each year.

in 2010, Big Brum was awarded an Action for Children’s Arts Members Award for its outstanding contribution to the aim of enriching children’s lives through the arts. The company is also recognised internationally as a leading centre for excellence in arts education.

 

DRESS REHEARSAL

WEEK 7

Rehearsal 3

The Rehearsal was guided and directed by our lead Lecturer Liselle.  We continued to develop our participatory project of the Hare and the Tortoise. We start by recapping up with what we had done in the previous rehearsal. The aim was to identify  the characteristics of the animals. Liselle had asked the team to do a bit of research on the animals and this is what we came up with:

  •  Elephant  peacemaker and tries to support and encourage tortoise, courageous, supportive, empathetic, big friendly giant, clumsy, wrinkly, heavy, slow, confident, wise, humble
  • Tortoise : good at numbers, slow, shy, willing to learn, reserved, naïve, confused, insecure,
  • Hare : careless, comes across as over-confident, trickster, big-headed, arrogant, attention-seeking, insecure, jealous, competitive, feels isolated, neglected, belittling, low-self-esteem, teasing, big baby.
  • Fox:  Teasing, sly, Sliding, Elegant, Sneaky, Hard to get, fast, stops and hides and sneakily looks around; nasty, enjoys causing trouble, stirring things

After identifying the characteristics of the animals it become easy to embody them hence transforming ourselves into character, we were then divided in groups of three and each group represented  an animal, we then came up with 3 movements that portrayed the animal’s characteristics. I was in the Tortoise category and we came up with 3 fantastic movements. and those were: playing, eating and sleeping.

I found it really hard to be in and out of character, but liselle  guided us through and gradually I felt flexible and confident enough. from the outline we had made in previous rehearsal we had a run through. Adding music, name game, movements and actions. we also tried out the costumes and the props this made it more colourful and lively

what I found challenging was devising participatory performance with imaginary audience but liselle manages with her skills she managed to make it so lively with continuously guiding and encouraging us

 

 

 

PRECIS

ROLE, FRAME AND POSITIONING WHEN USING PROCESS DRAMA BY Brian Edminson

In his article  Brian Edminson reflects how teachers and students position themselves  while using drama. The teacher and student are not immersed in an imagined world that separates them from the everyday world. However, they interpret their imagined experiences for meaning that connects with their daily life, therefore, developing more understanding of a facet of life. This article focuses on paying attention to role frame and position in both everyday worlds of the classroom as well as in any imagined world that is created.

Role

When participants in drama activities take on ‘roles’ they imagine that they are other people. However, Goffman (1974) suggests that people have their social roles in their everyday lives. This exists in parallel with imagined role

Even though drama practitioners often talk about being ‘in role’ or ‘out of role’, from sociological sense we are always ‘in role’. We often change roles as we interact with different people in different situations that can include activities in imagined worlds of theatre, play and drama.

The imagined and everyday worlds of drama

Drama takes place in two worlds simultaneously. Audience at the theatre sit in everyday worlds watching an imagined world that the actors, director and technical managers create for them. O’Neill (1995) explains that in process drama there is no external audience to the work. Therefore, the teacher and students are the equivalent not only of theatre actors, directors and technicians but also of theatre audience. In process drama, participants use their social and cultural imagination to create a shared imagined world. The imagined world does not replace the everyday classroom world but rather begins to be created alongside the everyday world

Heathcote (1975) explains that the teacher and students interact in both worlds simultaneously and move back and forth between them at will

Frame

Goffman (197) explains that we make sense of the world by interpreting situations through various perspectives or social cultural frames. The imagined worlds that we create when we use drama are also space-times where students and teachers can use and explore frames normally unavailable to them every day.

Frames develop in communities of practice. Wenger (1998) explained that people share frameworks with other people who regard themselves as members of various ‘communities practice’. The social activities that occur in every classroom space over time create the discourses of a classroom community over time create certain shared expectations and assumptions that frame how they interpret events. Social activities in an imagined world creates community and a shared frame just as everyday activities do. activities that are collaborative practices to achieve shared goals, build a feeling of commonality and a history of shared accomplishments whether or not participants identify them as IF or IS + IF activities

It can therefore be concluded that participants do more than take on roles and adopt frames in process drama. As teacher and students interact in both everyday world and imagined worlds they embody one another

 

 

developing participatory applied performance project

WEEK 6

REHEASHEL 2

We started the session with a recap of what we had done in the previous session using video recordings, pictures and documentation from the previous lesson that Liselle had taken. We were directed by Liselle. In and out of character a drama process described by Heathcote. He explains that the teacher and students interact in both worlds simultaneously and move back and forth between them at will. We used.

We continued to develop piece, the process was very amazing, seeing the script come to life, the practice and session with Liselle helped to understand and develop my interest

Through The mantle of the expert which Dorothy Heathcote discribes as a student-centered dramatic-inquiry-based approach to teaching, both the group and the Lecturer Liselle re-framed in fictional roles in which we were “endowed” as experts in a specific field. Heathcote explains that we students are more than passive receivers of knowledge. This means that they we are the ones constructing the performance. With this approach, what happens within the process of the drama is what the lesson is, though it fosters critical thinking skills of us students about facts.

 

PRECIS

Jackson. (2007) Theatre, education and the making of meanings

This book for theatre for social change, kids, theater for development, museum reenactments, prisons or seniors. It is a study of theatre’s educational role during the 20th and the first years of the 21st centuries. Jackson explores variety of ways through which theatre’s educational potential has been harnessed and theorised, the book examines  the tension between theatre as education and theatre as ‘art’: it explores  the preliminary discussion of key theoretical approaches to aesthetics, dramatic art and learning while examining the relationships between them. It Follows a the study is organised into two broad chronological periods: one of the main aim of this was to develop an argument about how we might better understand the value these kinds of theatre, hitorically, philosophically and pragmatically. Early developments in European and American theatre up to the end of world war two, and participatory theatre and education since world war two. Within each period, a cluster of key themes is introduced and then re-visited and examined through a number of specific examples – seen within their cultural contexts – in subsequent chapters. [In this way, the approach resists being driven by chronology but recognises the value of locating and interrogating notions and examples of educational theatre practice within historical contexts.] Topics covered include an early use of theatre to compaign for prison reform

 

 

 

DEVELOPING PARTICIPATORY APPLIED PERFORMANCE PROJECT

WEEK 5

FIRST REHEARSAL

The session was to take place in USS. But wasn’t sure so I ended up at half-moon. So I joined the group a bit late, they were going throw the script and developing/drawing strategies of creating a participatory performance.

The group shared they ideals as well as showcase what we had wanted to do. During the discussion. The group agreed to:

  • We can use songs
  • cancel all the Bilingual words and work with the English words,
  • Use costumes
  • Incorporate our languages as we had a ‘bilingual’ theme to factor
  • Audience participation

We start to develop action to the script/story using the techniques from Drama lessons for five to eleven year olds like collective storytelling, hot seating, improvisation, sculpting, still image among others. It was exciting to finally be able to put what we have been learning to practice and for the factor that our tutor had found us a partnership with profession practitioners

We then had liselle lead us through actual practical’s using Process theatre. We were paired up and asked to pick a scene in the story and create still images. We were then asked to add words and lastly movement and emotions

 

PRECIS

THEATRE FOR YOUNG AUDIENCES

Rose Bruford College’s Theatre for Young Audiences Centre, was launched in April 2011 by its Patron David Wood. The centre is chaired by Jeremy Harrison who is Subject Specialist for MA in TYA and Programme Director of Actor Musicianship BA (hons) actor training programme.

The centre has links to TYA-UK. Paul Harman and an international advisory panel form a steering group. Stuart Bennett of London Drama was part of this group until his death in January 2015. The TYA centre aims to be both an advocate for the sector and a resource for practitioners, scholars and students interested in this area of theatre practice. Output will focus on practice, making sense of its location in one of the country’s leading drama schools.

Rose Bruford College has a long-standing relationship with the TYA movement and the centre is part of strategy to strengthen that relationship.

The Centre includes a range of resources including: links to archives, organizations and practitioners both within the UK and internationally; and accounts of a range of practical research projects. They have an archive attached to centre, which can be accessed by appointment, and run regular events including workshops, study days and discussions.

If you are interested in full or part time study in this area you may wish to consider our MA in Theatre for Young Audiences or our actor training degrees in Acting and Actor Musicianship which include a module focusing on TYA.

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE IN EDUCATION

WEEK 4

INTRODUCATION TO THEATRE IN EDUCATION

I was very excited for the opportunity of having to work with profession theatre company. The session was held in theatre at the Half Moon premises and we will be devising a project that will be facilitated and performed with a group of school children. Beccy gave us a brief tour of Half moon and we then we were introduction to Theatre In Education. lisellWe were put in pairs and asked to go through documents from the archive which we believed would be ideal for the project performance. After we all agreed to settle for Bilingual (The Hare and the Tortoise.) it was a play written in Bilingualism and English and was targeting the Bangladeshi community which had about 90% of the children in schools in Tower Hamlet. This play toured Tower Hamlet in 1988.

We had a quick run through the script. It was a play set up in a forest with different animals and what stood out for is it was how the play tried address appreciating our differences and the use of different language. Our group consisted of 8 people different Counties and our Facilitator Lisselle though that we can utilise our different backgrounds and cultures during the performance.

Beccy provided us with forms with instructions on how to apply for DBS. She was emphasised that we need to call and get it sorted as we would not work with children unless the CRB was available.

 

PRECIS

DRAMA LESSONS FOR FIVE TO ELEVEN YEAR OLDS BY JUDITH ACROYD AND JO BOULTON

Is a book carefully selected to meet  a range of learning objectives in various curriculum areas and develop areas and particular literacy skills that combine new which identify how the drama activities  and classic lessons. The authors break down terms used in lesson plans as below

 Collective drawing This means individuals adding details to a picture or a map. The teacher prepares a basic outline of the picture or map and one and two children come forward at a time and draw on the basic outline. To quicken the process, sometimes each child can be given a paper or ‘post it’ note on which to draw. Then each of their drawing is stuck on the outline picture. This when finished gives the finished product collective ownership and if time is restricted, they can finish later

Collective or collaborative storytelling: This means, the whole class joins in with the telling of the story. The details of the story is supplied by the children eg by use of sound effects, words, phrases and whole sentences and the teacher controls the development of the plot by leading the storytelling and inviting the children.

Costuming: Selected props or items of cloths are chosen by the teacher to indicate a particular role to the class. its important as a teacher to put on the any costume in front of the children. So they observe the teacher going into role and dispel confusion about who the teacher actually is. Sometimes with little children, you can let them help you put on the costume and fastenings and also giving advice as to which to put on first

Defining space: This is the way in which the teacher and class agree on the fictional space’s features and parameters. The classroom space is defined as the place in the drama and items of furniture may be used to define the space. e.g. two chairs may mark the position of the gateposts leading to a castle

Hot seating : The teacher or child is questioned in role by the others. Whoever is in the ‘hot seat’ answers as their character would

Improvisation: The children act and speak in role without preplanning. the teacher often leads in improvisation to enable her keep control of the direction of the improvisation

Narration: The teacher uses narration in drama activities as a controlling device. its useful as the teacher is empowered to dictate particular aspects of the drama

Overheard conversations: Children in groups make up conversations that people in their drama may have had. they then overhear one another’s conversations as though eve dropping. this enables the children to work in small groups and give all of them the chance to comment in role on the action of the drama

 Ritual: Any action no matter how simple and mundane can be performed in a formal and dignified manner to make actions seem significant. eg putting goodies into Grandma’s basket in a ritualistic manner one at a time with a particular phrase will bring about a more serious level of though and an exciting atmosphere

 Role on the wall: The outline of a person is drawn onto a large sheet of paper. information about the person in the drama is collected and written around the outline. it is possible to contrast different types of information in a role on the wall. for example, what the character says can be written in one colour and what she thinks in another

Sculpting: This involves the children making statues of each other or the teacher through suggestions and physical manipulation. Sculptures can be made to crystallise ideas about a character such as what the bully looked like or to express a feeling like anger physically

 Statementing : This involves the children making statements about a person, event or place in the drama. The statement can be made in a ritualistic manner with children stepping forward one at a time to say their statement. They may remain frozen in a gesture appropriate to the statement

Still image or frozen picture: This is similar to sculpting but involves small groups or the whole class. Children depict a moment in time using their own bodies. It’s a frozen moment that we imagine time has stopped giving us opportunity to look closely at it

 Teacher in role: The teacher takes the role of a character in the drama. This enables the teacher to work with the children from inside the drama. Additional information can be given through the teachers role and questions asked to challenge the children’s ideas

Though tracking: thought tunnels and though tapping: Though tracking enables children in role to speak aloud the thoughts that would normally remain concealed. This can be done in different ways such as ‘thought tunnels’ and ‘though tapping’.

Thought tunnels: requires the children to face one another in two lines. Then the teacher or child walks slowly between the two lines through the tunnel as character X in the drama. the children can then be asked to speak loudly the thoughts that character X might have at this point in the drama. its best to have voices from alternating sides speaking at the moment character x passes them by.

Thought tapping: is where the teacher literally taps a child on the shoulder as a signal for the child to speak the thoughts of the character he is playing. This may be done in the midst of mimed activity or in still images

 

Black History through Drama In Education

IMG_0059Week 3

BLACK HISTORY

We started with a warm up execise led by liselle and and then went through our group readings. The session was run by Rebecca Hemmings from Birmingham she runs an organisation called strawberry words. She facilitates Black History through Drama in Education. This involved themes and participatory drama strategies.

ANANSI

Rebecca uesd a african story of Anansi, a ½ man ½ spider who migrated from Ghana to Jamaica. He was a trickster and everyone was wary of him. One day, he saw some ripe mangoes across the river. He couldn’t swim so begged the birds to donate their feathers. The birds knew he wasn’t upto no good but gave him the their feathers anyway. Anansi tried on several occasions to fly but failed to the amusement of the birds. He eventually flies but eats all the fruits on the fruit tree. While asleep, the birds took their feathers and upon waking up anansi tricked the crocodile to take him back to shore before feasting on his eggs. Making it the reason crocodile swishes his tail searching for Anansi

As she told the story she got us involved and embodying the characters by encouraging saying the words and doing the actions in the story. This manner of delivery would help the kids to: The kids will embody it more They will own it The story included a lot of animations and children can participate and learn from it especially if English is not their first language Helped enhance their listening and speaking skills Build confidence

Queen Nzinga

In the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, states on the Central African coast found their economic power and territorial control threatened by Portuguese attempts to establish a colony at Luanda (in present-day Angola). Many of these states had become regional powers through trade in African slaves. It was the growing demand for this human labor in New World colonies such as Brazil that ultimately led Portugal to seek military and economic control of this region. One leader who proved to be adept at overcoming these difficulties was the queen of Ndongo, Ana Nzinga.

In 1624, Ana Nzinga inherited rule of Ndongo, a state to the east of Luanda populated primarily by Mbundu peoples. At that moment, the kingdom was under attack from both Portuguese as well as neighboring African aggressors. Nzinga realized that, to remain viable, Ndongo had to reposition itself as an intermediary rather than a supply zone in the slave trade. To achieve this, she allied Ndongo with Portugal, simultaneously acquiring a partner in its fight against its African enemies and ending Portuguese slave raiding in the kingdom. Ana Nzinga’s baptism, with the Portuguese colonial governor serving as godfather, sealed this relationship. By 1626, however, Portugal had betrayed Ndongo, and Nzinga was forced to flee with her people further west, where they founded a new state at Matamba, well beyond the reach of the Portuguese. To bolster Matamba’s martial power, Nzinga offered sanctuary to runaway slaves and Portuguese-trained African soldiers and adopted a form of military organization known as kilombo, in which youths renounced family ties and were raised communally in militias. She also fomented rebellion within Ndongo itself, which was now governed indirectly by the Portuguese through a puppet ruler. Nzinga found an ally in the Netherlands, which seized Luanda for its own mercantile purposes in 1641. Their combined forces were insufficient to drive the Portuguese out of Angola, however, and after Luanda was reclaimed by the Portuguese, Nzinga was again forced to retreat to Matamba. From this point on, Nzinga focused on developing Matamba as a trading power by capitalizing on its position as the gateway to the Central African interior. By the time of her death in 1661, Matamba was a formidable commercial state that dealt with the Portuguese colony on an equal footing. Nzinga, who reconverted to Christianity before her death at the age of eighty-one,

She asked to use the story create various drama strategies that included still images, games, sound and improvisation. I cried any imaginary image of queen Nzinga’s secrete life which reflect the soft side of her

I was intrigued by the way she used improvisation in her work and created a playing environment yet a learning one

 

AFTERNOON

In the afternoon, we went to stratford royal theatre to try and hear talks about possibilities of internships at the theatre it was great because it give us the opportunity to explore and get some experience in the market industry.

 

 

PRECIS

IMMEDIATE THEATRE 

This is a theatre that works with young people and communities in Hackney and East London to ensure access for all to arts activities that break down barriers and engage people in debate. The theatre’s vision is for a society where questioning, articulate and motivated people create and collaborate to build thriving communities

The mission of immediate theatre is to engage young people especially those at risk of marginalisation or exclusion in high quality artistic projects which involve creative and personal development, training and employment that equip them with the skills of inquiry, collaboration and communication needed today to shape the thriving communities of tomorrow.

The company aims are:

  • To provide inspirational participatory theatre programmes enabling young people at high risk to reach their potential
  • To offer a theatre programme for young audiences which explores social issues and enables them to engage in the process of change
  • To improve employability for young people and create pathways to employment in the arts.

To support the involvement of young people in decision making and to develop future community leadersFrom the outset their vision was to work closely with locally based organisations and community groups to create theatre which engaged people in the process of change. The combination of participatory projects and professional productions was designed to bring local theatre practitioners together with the community to create inspiring work with high artistic standards for specific audiences. The term “immediate” implying “right here” on your doorstep and the “right now” of being responsive to current issues affecting local people.Immediate Theatre not only gives people a stage on which to perform, but also the confidence to stand on that stage and have their voice heard. Nurturing this new found confidence is important to Immediate Theatre. Therefore, they create supported pathways across our projects so participation are not just an isolated experience but an ongoing journey.

 

 

 

PROCESS DRAMA & MANTLE OF THE EXPERT

WEEK 2

PROCESS DRAMA & MANTLE OF THE EXPERT (MOE) SEAL WOMAN & LITTLE RED.

The morning session was led by our Lecturer Liselle Terret we started with stretching warm exercise and we then focused on Process drama, this practice was developed primarily from the work of Brian Way, Dorothy Heathcote and Gavin Bolton and through the work of other leading drama practitioners. It can be referred to as a method of teaching and learning drama where both the students and teacher work in and out of role. As a teaching methodology,

Liselle used Irish family generation story(The Seal Wife) The story was about a fisherman who saw a seal take off its seal skin turn into a very beautiful woman and busk in the sun in the middle of the water everytime he went fishing. He was deeply attracted to the woman so one day he captured the seal and made her his wife. He hid her seal clothes on top of the roof. Years went by and the seal woman gave birth to 3 children. One day when the roof was being repaired the seal skin fell out of the roof. When the children saw it they took it to their mother who disappeared was never seen again.

The lecturer asked us to created still images of any sense in the story, embodying the story raised a lot of questions and created a wide imagination like:

  • The woman had no choice but to do what he wanted, to be his wife’
  • ‘The sea and the sand were not happy with the way the woman was treated’
  • ‘She was being forced, she was going against what she wanted’
  • ‘He wants her but she wanted the best of the two worlds, the sea and the fisherman‘
  • Why did he hide the seal clothing
  • Did she go with him willingly
  • Did she have a choice
  • Did she look for the seal skin
  • Did she love her children
  • Did she love him
  • Why didn’t he just destroy the seal skin
  • Did the kids have mom’s Genes

The primary purpose of process drama was to establish an imagined world, a ‘dramatic elsewhere’ created by the participants as they discover, articulate and sustain fictional roles and situations. As it unfolds, the process contained powerful elements of composition and contemplation, but improvised encounters will remain at the heart of the event as the source of its dramatic power’ to explore this Leselle grouped us into 4’s and asked us to create a scene of the fisherman having nightmare

I felt the story was so powerful as it addressed lots of issues in relaxed and dramatic form like: belonging, identity, rights, interests, immigration/refugee, male dominance masculine power and authority concealment, denial and repression in other words blending elements of process drama with forum theatre techniques, enhanced forum theatre allowed participants to explore issues as complex and problematic as conflict in greater depth, thus further enhancing their understanding of both form and content

 

 

PRECIS

IMMEDIATE THEATRE 

This is a theatre that works with young people and communities in Hackney and East London to ensure access for all to arts activities that break down barriers and engage people in debate. The theatre’s vision is for a society where questioning, articulate and motivated people create and collaborate to build thriving communities

The mission of immediate theatre is to engage young people especially those at risk of marginalisation or exclusion in high quality artistic projects which involve creative and personal development, training and employment that equip them with the skills of inquiry, collaboration and communication needed today to shape the thriving communities of tomorrow.

The company aims are:

  • To provide inspirational participatory theatre programmes enabling young people at high risk to reach their potential
  • To offer a theatre programme for young audiences which explores social issues and enables them to engage in the process of change
  • To improve employability for young people and create pathways to employment in the arts.

To support the involvement of young people in decision making and to develop future community leadersFrom the outset their vision was to work closely with locally based organisations and community groups to create theatre which engaged people in the process of change. The combination of participatory projects and professional productions was designed to bring local theatre practitioners together with the community to create inspiring work with high artistic standards for specific audiences. The term “immediate” implying “right here” on your doorstep and the “right now” of being responsive to current issues affecting local people.Immediate Theatre not only gives people a stage on which to perform, but also the confidence to stand on that stage and have their voice heard. Nurturing this new found confidence is important to Immediate Theatre. Therefore, they create supported pathways across our projects so participation are not just an isolated experience but an ongoing journey.

TEAM 2 OVERVIEW

 

WEEK 1

OVERVIEW OF THE TERM, ASSESSMENT & PROJECTS PLUS BECCY (HALF MOON) AND LUCY (DBS)

 

The session started with a warm stretching warm up, Liselle Terret the course lecturer gave quick overviews of the term, assessment & projects. She clearly explained that a key part of this term included a special focus on one area of applied practice through a tutor-supported practical project in education or community set-up. We would divide ourselves into 2 groups. Before we chose she gave a clear brief of each practice

Theatre In Education (TiE) and Mantle of the Expert (MoE): Led by Liselle Terret

Theatre In Education (TiE) and Drama In Education (DiE) (with specific use of Heathcote’s Mantle of the Expert (MoE) / and O’Neill’s Process Drama)  are participatory and educational forms of theatre and drama whereby the the process of engagement becomes a learning tool in themselves. Participant centred and following a series of planned & structured events, a narrative unfolds that often addresses social / political / educational questions developed by the participants.

 

TiE first gained recognition at The Belgrade Theatre, Coventry touring politicized participatory drama and theatre programmes to schools enabling children to gain agency and to to engage critically with their immediate, political and historical environment as well as having an educational impact upon the children’s learning. Arguably Mantle of the Expert (MoE) had a profound impact upon TiE was coined and developed Dorothy Heathcote and critiqued and further developed by Gavin Bolton (Protective Role) , and then Cecily O’Neill (as Process Drama) . MoE is a participative educational-drama process whereby the participants and facilitator (TiR) multi-role as they develop the fictional narrative. Key to this form of participative drama, the participants become the experts which challenges the static student-teacher dynamic. Students on this module will interrogate these practices with the intent of querying their relevancy  within today’s social, political and education climate taking into account issues of gender, race, class, identity, agency.

She had aso invited Beccy Allen from Half Moon : Acompany that will be working with the (TIE) students Beccy explained that half-moon is theater currently producing and presenting professional theatre for young people, she also gave a brief history of the organization, from foundation to the moment and this included the various organisations they work with like Hospice .

Leselle also explained that theTIE students will need a DBS check since they will be working with children so she invited Lucy Kannenberg who is in charge of DBS in UEL. She explained that it was important to have a DBS filled up and submitted way before our project started and she provided the DBS formed which to be filled and returned to lucy at the HUB

And the second group was to work with Veronica Needa playback theatre

Lecturer’s brief

Playback Theatre is an original form of improvisational theatre in which audience members tell stories from their lives and watch them enacted on the spot. Founded in 1975, Playback Theatre is practiced in hundreds of locations and contexts around the world. You will learn the basic principles; key Playback Theatre performance forms; some history and geography of its spread and applications; and the arc of a performance. We will integrate songs, games, and exercises for voice, body, imagination, spontaneity and ensemble development.

Leselle explained herself with half-moon will be working with the TIE group to devise a project that will be facilitated and performed with a group of school children

And the playback theatre group with the help of Veronica will devise a play back piece to be facilitated and performed in the community

 

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PRECIS

THE BOY IN THE DRESS 

The boy in the Dress  was a novel by David Williams. the project was intended to be used as a pretext for a MoE project that aimed to encourage children to explore the notion of the fluidity and the construction of their own gender, hence become more aware of their own role in the regulation of gender conformity. The boy in the dress was a Drama in Education project for year 5 and 6 which originated as residency in 2011. A group of young people identified themselves as transgender and led to the development of MOE. This then was developed further through delivery at various primary schools by undergraduate students.

Terett uses the children’s novel  with the year 5 children to created performances and engagement which explored gendered feminity in their school. she explains that most recently, the project was facilitated with year 5 class at a South East London. The children got in and out of a number of roles with Terett as the teacher-in-role. This encouraged the children to question notions of gender as the drama requires them to critically reflect upon their own understandings and experiences of gender identity roles. Therefore, it is summed that The boy in the dress project was created to offer a pedagogical space for the children to be able to hold in their minds that Dennis could be any of the children in the classroom. Therefore, they should start transcending the binary values and dare to step outside of the heteronormative matrix if they chose to without fear of recrimination